On April 19, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission approved a final rule revising CFTC Regulation 160.5. The amended rule implements the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act’s (FAST Act) December 2015 statutory amendment to the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLB Act) by providing an exception to the requirement that certain futures commission merchants, retail foreign exchange dealers, commodity trading advisors, commodity pool operators, introducing brokers, major swap participants and swap dealers (each, a “covered person”) to provide annual privacy notices to their respective customers. (The obligation to provide an initial privacy notice is unchanged).
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On March 4, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) released an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPR) to seek information from the public about certain issues related to Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing. In particular, the CFPB issued the ANPR to obtain more information (1) about the relationship between an assessment of a consumer’s “ability to repay” and the terms of a PACE financing agreement, and (2) related to the extension of Truth In Lending Act (TILA) general civil liability to PACE transactions.

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On June 15, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), announced that it is seeking comments on proposed updates to its prepaid rule, “Prepaid Accounts under the Electronic Fund Transfer Act (Regulation E) and the Truth In Lending Act (Regulation Z)” (Prepaid Rule). The Prepaid Rule incorporates prepaid accounts under Regulations E and Z and was originally published in the Federal Register on November 22, 2016 (81 FR 83934) and amended on April 25, 2017 (82 FR 18975).
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On May 10, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) held a field hearing and issued a notice and request for information related to the small business lending market. Section 1071 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act amended the Equal Credit Opportunity Act to require “financial institutions” (as defined in Section 1071) to compile, maintain and report information concerning credit applications made by women-owned, minority-owned and small businesses. The purpose of the data collection is to facilitate enforcement of fair lending laws and to enable communities, governmental entities and creditors to identify business and community development needs and opportunities of women-owned, minority-owned and small businesses.
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On Thursday, June 2, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) released proposed rules affecting the payday and short-term loan industry as part of its authority to prohibit the use of unfair or abusive acts and practices in connection with the provision of consumer financial products and services under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.
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On May 18, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (FRB), the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA), and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) (collectively, the Agencies) issued guidance outlining joint supervisory expectations regarding deposit-reconciliation practices that may be detrimental to customers.
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On May 5, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (Bureau) issued a proposed rule that would prohibit covered providers of certain consumer financial products and services from using an agreement with a consumer that provides for arbitration of any future dispute between the parties to bar the consumer from filing or participating in a class action with respect to the covered consumer financial product or service. 
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The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (Bureau) issued its final policy on its issuance of no-action letters on February 18, which is intended to further objectives under section 1021 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (Dodd-Frank Act). Under the Policy, Bureau staff would, “in its discretion, issue no-action letters (NALs) to specific applicants in instances involving innovative financial products or services that promise substantial consumer benefit where there is substantial uncertainty whether or how specific provisions of statutes implemented or regulations issued by the Bureau would be applied . . .” According to the Bureau, a NAL would advise the recipient that, subject to its stated limitations, the staff has no present intention to recommend initiation of an enforcement or supervisory action against the requester with respect to a specified matter. However, NALs would be subject to modification or revocation at any time at the discretion of the staff, and may be conditioned on particular undertakings by the applicant with respect to product or service usage and data-sharing with the Bureau. Further, NALs would be nonbinding on the Bureau, and would not bind courts or other actors who might challenge a NAL recipient’s product or service, such as other regulators or parties in litigation.
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On February 3, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) sent a letter to the nation’s top 25 retail banking companies urging them to do more to create or promote deposit accounts designed to meet consumers’ financial needs. The CFPB is urging banks and credit unions to offer consumers accounts that do not authorize them to spend money they don’t have.
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